Friday, July 3, 2009

HELP PETS COPE WITH FIREWORKS



Heya Hounders,
Homer J. and Alex P. Kitten here with a word of caution for all of our friends. Tomorrow is the dreaded 4th of July. None of us Bumpass Hounds and Kitties like it much because people all around the development will be setting off fire works and pyrotechnics all weekend. The official Lake Anna display is at 9:15 PM Saturday night out on lake dike #2, it's far away so it won't bother us. It's all of the neighborhood stuff that rattles our cages (please excuse the pun). Mom and dad have learned to keep us all inside with the radios and TVs on kinda loud most of the time. This tends to desensitise us to the unexpected booms. We have the window blinds down and the A/C blasting. Some of us prefer to "hide" in the MBR on the floor at the other side of the big bed. It'll all be over by Monday and we'll get back to SOP. Outside activity will probably start being curtailed this afternoon or evening depending on the noise activity from the illegal fireworks. This will be Radar's first go at it so the plan is to keep him inside and in his crate with a cover over it at night and the radio on. Here's an appropriate blog page dad took off of the Internet. Y'all be as safe as you can this entire weekend, especially tomorrow.
- The Bumpass Hounds and Kitties.


TALL TAILS - A PET LOVER'S BLOG
By Lilly Anderson

Fireworks are a fact of life this time of year. As many pet owners know, fireworks can scare the daylights out of your cats and dogs. Rabbits, guinea pigs and horses aren't immune, either.
The sounds, sights and smells of fireworks contribute to pets' anxiety. Frightened dogs, cats, horses and other animals might run away, or worse - run into traffic.
Here are some tips I found for pet owners from a couple of Web sites:


WRAL.com
Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals

Unscheduled fireworks:
Be prepared for your neighbors to set off fireworks anytime. Be sure that your pets are wearing identification tags or have microchips in case they run away.
Never walk your dog while fireworks are being set off.
Allow your cats or dogs to take refuge under furniture or in a corner. Don't try to tempt your pet because this could cause more stress.
Speak to your vet about a non-sedating remedy to keep your pet calm (this is also a good idea during storm season).

Scheduled fireworks
If you know a fireworks display will be going on nearby, distract your pet with chew toys and games, or play with another pet that does not share his or her fear.
Don't take pets to fireworks displays. Leave them indoors at home. Close all doors and windows, curtains and blinds, and put on music or the television to muffle the sound.
Bring small animals such as rabbits or guinea pigs indoors or into an outhouse or garden shed to give them extra protection.
Horses often bolt from firework noise and become injured. Always make sure horses and ponies are stabled while fireworks are being set off. Make sure fireworks are not in view by closing the stable door.
If you have time, desensitize your pet by playing CDs with sounds such as thunder, fireworks, trains, sirens, etc. After your pets get comfortable with the sounds at a lower volume, gradually increase the volume.
Pheromones. Really.
An interesting tip from the Web site of RSPCA, a non-profit organization in England and Wales, is to ask your vet about the Dog Appeasing Pheromone, a synthetic version of a chemical produced by a female dog shortly after she has given birth.
"The pheromone reassures newborn puppies and naturally calms them down. Scientists have discovered it also helps calm older dogs as well. A simple plug-in diffuser that disperses the chemical into the room is available at some veterinary practices. It is safe and easy to use."

1 comment:

Steve, Kat, & Wilbur said...

I don't really like the fireworks. It was very noisy at our house, so Mom and Dad took us to the dog park for a while to play and escape and then Dad brought his noisy fan in from the garage. The fan was nice because it covered the noisy fireworks and it also helped cool me down. It's been hot here and we don't have A/C!

Steve

FOR CHANCE, GORDON, HOMER, RADAR, SPENCER, CHANDLER, MAXDOG, LUKE & BLUE, AND SO MANY OTHERS.

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If you can, please consider opening your home to a homeless animal, preferably a dog or cat or other domesticated animal; livestock does better on farms and wild animals do better in zoos and parks. Your local Humane Society or SPCA or Animal Shelter has a wide selection of could be, should be, pets looking for new homes. If you can't adopt, perhaps you can at least become a sponsor. We'll show you how to help out Almost Heaven Golden Retriever Rescue and Sanctuary (AHGRRS) on our blog page, but you can help out any organization of your choice, but please help; contribute or volunteer.
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