Monday, November 7, 2016

OUR NEWEST "KITTY"

Our newest feline member is YETI.  One day when M&D were taking one of us (?) to our vet for something or other, there was a very small pure white kitten in the big "NEEDS A HOME" cage. Mom was really taken by the little guy's cuteness and the M&D decided to adopt the rescued kitten.

Yeti on the cat tree

Seems that some man had brought the kitten into the vet after finding him under his car.  The kitten appeared to be only a few weeks old and he was pretty small.  So the little guy got a new home here with the rest of us.  The guy was so small that dad had to go up to Pet-Smart and buy a kitten bottle feeding kit and kitten formula.  Dad actually would hold the little guy in his hand and put the nipple into the kittens mouth with his other hand.  The guy sure ate a lot.  Here's one of his first pictures taken from when dad put him up on our cat tree;

The Abominable Snowman "YETI"

Because the little guy was pure white and liked to stand up on mom's lap looking like the Abominable Snowman, M&D decided to name him "The Yeti" but later kinda dropped the "The" off of his name.  One night after dad gave him his bottle, Yeti decided to poop all over dad's t-shirt - YUK!  Mom told dad to clean him up as his mis mother would, but dad decided to just give Yeti a regular bath.. One of our Walt Disney World plastic popcorn buckets proved to be a perfect size in which to "dip wash" him. Fortunately, as Yeti started to grow he was able to eat more solid wet kitten food and water  instead of the bottle fed formula; and he wasn't really fitting into the popcorn bucket anymore either.  During one of Yeti's first physical exams with our vet, Doc Murphy was concerned that Yeti was registering as a low FIV positive on his blood tests.  Mom and the Doc decided to monitor and retest him periodically.  Three years later Yeti still tests low FIV positive but neither he nor any of our other cats have shown any FIV associated health problem.

Jack watches over his pal Yeti

Yeti has experience a subtle color change to a beige blend with visible rings on his tail.  His eyes are still blue and he has gotten considerably bigger in size.  Only Boru, our 15 year old Maine Conn Cat, is bigger.  Boru is our TC (Top Cat) but Yeti wants to be TC.  Yeti hasn't tried to exert himself over Boru but tends to bully the girls a little bit.  The girls aren't having any of it so Yeti has to settle for just being one of the crowd.  Here are some Yeti picture from the last 3 years.

Boru with Yeti when he, Yeti, was little


Yeti "mood" indicator when bothered

Dad taught Yeti how to salute

Starting to get bigger

Yeti loves boxes

Alex and Yeti

Yeti needs a drink of water

Getting a LOT bigger

______________________________________________________________


OUR FAVORITE VETERINARIAN

CORI MURPHY DAYTON DVM

Lake Wales Veterinary Hospital


PET INFO:
MICROCHIPS:  THE EVOLUTION OF PET IDENTIFICATION
In the 1980’s I had my first experience with microchips as an identification of Emus. These large flightless birds were hard to tell apart and leg bands were dangerous to apply and hard to read. I started placing microchips in the tail tissue and used a “reader” to keep records on the individual birds. Since then the use of these chips has evolved for the benefit of animals in many ways. Specific identification using a “chip” was required for international shipment of pets…certification of health in dogs ( i.e. hips, elbows, eyes, and heart)…and Florida Fish and Wildlife has statutes requiring microchipping for the large snakes (Burmese, Reticulated, and African Rock Pythons and Anacondas).
As veterinarians we recommend and apply many microchips as a form of permanent identification of pets. The “chip” is actually a small sterile glass pellet inserted (aseptically) under the skin usually between the shoulder blades. A “reader” or transponder is used to “read” the chip number which is on a copper strip in the glass pellet. This sterile glass pellet is inert and has a very low risk of problems. Some early reports claimed that they caused cancer, but these reports were mostly un-documented. I have had an occasional chip come out as a result of infection around the chip. I recommend that veterinarians apply the chips ( it is a fairly large needle to insert the chip). Owners can buy the chips and administer them themselves, but registration of the chips is often not followed through.
The most wonderful result of microchipping is when an animal is “lost” and shows up elsewhere… the chip is identified, and the animal is reunited with the family. I have heard of Florida dogs ending up in Ohio and being reunited 5 years later!!! If someone steals your dog, they can remove collars and tags, but a microchip can prove ownership.
There are several competing “chip” manufacturers. The chips used to be a 9 digits but are now “European” with 15 numbers and digits. The frequencies are different for Europe and America but most scanners will pick up all the chips. This is not always the case for the older scanners. The microchips are NOT gps locators and can only give up their ID numbers when they are “read” by a scanner. When we have a stray or found animal come into the veterinary Hospital, we will first scan for a chip, and we can often find the owner if an ID chip is found.
I have used microchips in dogs, cats,horses, ferrets, birds, snakes, camels, and even used one in an elephant. New technology has even developed “doggie doors “ that recognize the pets chip, and disallow entry through the door by other animals ( including the raccoon). While animal recovery requires registration and central information banking of the animal/owner information, efforts to simplify this are ongoing. The latest for us is a system called “Save This Life” which uses Google to help find the owners of the lost animal.  This generation of microchip includes a coating to prevent migration of the chip, and a metal tag with a machine stamped # ID. The ID can be “Googled” with subsequent ability to privately contact the pets owner with text messaging or e-mail. The pet owner even receives a GPS map of where the finder of the pet is located. This chip even includes a $1000. Lost Pet Health Insurance for 1 year after activation. The Save This Life also send out alerts to shelter and rescues within 25 miles and a Lost Pet Poster is sent to the owner…. Amazing advance in animal technology.
T.B.Schotman DVM

1 comment:

Gus said...

We think Yeti is pretty cute for a C.A.T. Probably it would be best if he waits a little while to challenge Boru. It would be a shame to mess up Yeti's pretty face.


GnT

FOR CHANCE, GORDON, HOMER, RADAR, SPENCER, CHANDLER, MAXDOG, LUKE & BLUE, AND SO MANY OTHERS.

National Canine Cancer Foundation

STEP UP TO ADOPT A PET

If you can, please consider opening your home to a homeless animal, preferably a dog or cat or other domesticated animal; livestock does better on farms and wild animals do better in zoos and parks. Your local Humane Society or SPCA or Animal Shelter has a wide selection of could be, should be, pets looking for new homes. If you can't adopt, perhaps you can at least become a sponsor. We'll show you how to help out Almost Heaven Golden Retriever Rescue and Sanctuary (AHGRRS) on our blog page, but you can help out any organization of your choice, but please help; contribute or volunteer.
- The Bumpass Hounds and Kitties

PLEASE HELP SPONSOR A SENIOR OR SPECIAL NEEDS GOLDEN

CAN'T ADOPT; BECOME AN ANGEL.
So many Senior and Special Needs Goldens do not find "forever homes". Many of these dogs have above average medical needs and costs, are maintained on "special" diets, or have other extraordinary needs. Your donations can be targeted towards a particular Senior or Special needs Golden Retriever. As a sponsor, you will receive updates about your "special" Golden, and will be mentioned in our quarterly newsletter as the dog's sponsor. We also accept Paypal donations. Please keep in mind that we are a non-profit organization and that your donation is fully tax-deductible. Please just write the Golden's name in the memo line of your check or Paypal submission when sponsoring a Golden Retriever.

A MUST READ FOR THE IN-THE-KNOW CAT

A MUST READ FOR THE IN-THE-KNOW CAT
Recommended by Boru; what more need we say?

TAKE THE PLEDGE

Pledge to Fight Animal Cruelty

GORDON'S PHOTO ALBUM SLIDESHOW

Total Pageviews

BUMPASS HOUNDS PLAYLIST


Get a playlist! Standalone player Get Ringtones